IACA Journal Fall 2013 - page 17

| (505) 265-9149
15
It
s like discovering
a rare archeological find.
But one that offers
shopping and sales.
Qualla Arts and Crafts
is dedicated to preserving centuries-old
Cherokee craftsmanship and the current artists and craftspeople
who keep historic techniques alive by displaying their work in our
store. Get your shopping started atQuallaArtsAndCrafts.com
| 828.497.3103
Basket making is a very time-consuming art form and, as a
result, there are not many basket makers active today. The
recent economic difficulties hit the Native American art world
in a very real way. It caused the value of traditional baskets to
decline, which allowed collectors to buy them at bargain-base-
ment prices. This created a shortage of high-quality baskets in
the marketplace.
Many stores selling Native American baskets also sell imported
reproductions. How do you tell if a basket is an authentic piece
of Native American art? “By the materials” Pat says. Imported
baskets are made differently, don’t use traditional materials like
willow, and the dyes used are not the same. The construction,
coloring and price of imported baskets should show the buyer
that they are not Native American made. Pat’s advice to buyers
is to educate yourself on baskets so that you know what you’re
looking at and go through a reputable seller. Buyers should look
for baskets that are in good condition, are tightly woven, and are
personally visually appealing.
Pat Harrington’s love and knowledge of basketry has brought
him several invitations to judge basket competitions at the
Gallup Tribal Ceremonial. He doesn’t have a website and
doesn’t promote himself as a wholesaler; this is because he has
maintained a loyal customer base over the last 30 years. De-
spite being on the road over 100 days a year, Pat finds time to
participate in the IACA Wholesale Market shows and an annual
antique show in Albuquerque, NM. He buys fetishes and jewel-
ry directly from the artists of Zuni Pueblo, and traditional rugs
and baskets wherever he can find them.
Giving Back
IN HOLLYWOOD
GREENHOMES
ONTHENAVAJO
RESERVATION
AWINTERVISITTOTAOSPUEBLO
BATTLE
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&BLACKKETTLE
WAMPUM
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Power of thePurple
TWILIGHT
ACTRESS
TINSELKOREY
PREVIEWOFHEARDMARKET2012
Lakota Indian Icon
BEDAZZLED
GOLD JEWELRY
1960
S
–TODAY
HOPI/TEWA
GENERATIONS
THENAMINGHAS
OFSANTAFE
BEYOND
GERONIMO
THEAPACHE
PEOPLE
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PASSAMAQUODDY
BASKETMASTER
JEREMY FREY
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THE
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14
INDY’S 20
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EITELJORG INDIANMARKET & FESTIVAL
LAKOTA
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CHARLENE
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A FAMILY
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KENNETH JOHNSON,
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ARTISTTONY
ABEYTA—P.144
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