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Volume 5, Issue 3

Page 3

b. If a design is stamped into silver, the most common metal used by Native Americans, the image should be clear.

c. High-quality pieces use stones that are well-cut and uniform in size and fit snug in their settings.

NOTE:

Imitations can be poorly cut and leave large amounts of metal-colored glue visible between the stone and the metal.

d. Look for the artist’s hallmark – a symbol or signature – to identify their work.

HOW CAN I GET MORE INFORMATION?

The Indian Arts and Crafts Board offers brochures and information about buying Indian arts and crafts and the laws protecting consum-

ers. Also, become a member of the IACB Source Directory which provides a free business listing for Native American artists and busi-

nesses.

Call the number below or check out our website for more information.

Indian Arts and Crafts Board –

1-888-ART-FAKE (1-888-278-3253)

www.doi.gov/iacb

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT OF THE INDIAN ARTS AND CRAFTS ACT and CREATING AND PROMOTING

AUTHENTIC NATIVE AMERICAN ARTS AND CRAFTS.

B

UYING

A

UTHENTIC

I

NDIAN

A

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C

RAFTS

continued from Page 1

A

N

A

SSOCIATION

S

V

ITALITY

. H

OW

D

OES

IACA S

TACK

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?

Membership is the key to the vitality of any association. People dedicated to a common cause which

benefits all members. The mission of IACA,

To Promote, Protect and Preserve Authentic American Indian

Art,

is the glue that binds all its members together. That is the common cause, and the benefit is that it

guarantees consumers that members have earned the right to display the IACA symbol by virtue of their

honesty and integrity.

IACA recently took the opportunity to look at our membership in relation to 914 other trade associa-

tions as presented in the

2015 Membership Marketing Membership Report

produced by Marketing General

Incorporated. We focused primarily on membership retention rates, since membership retention is one

of the most important measurements of an association’s vitality. Here is what we found:

IACA’s membership retention rate is significantly higher than nearly every other trade association. This clearly shows the continuing rele-

vance and vitality of the Indian Arts and Crafts Association.

Interestingly, the IACA average membership tenure is 15 years.

Eighteen people have been IACA members for 40 years more. Since 2012, 73 new

members have been added to the membership roster.

We also looked at the cost of association membership, compared to the IACA annual membership dues.

Contrasted to other trade associations, IACA provides an uncommon value when it comes to the price of membership.

By almost any measure, IACA continues to be a vital association after a rich 42-year history. Active membership participation is the key to

keeping our shared mission alive and well in the future.

IACA 2015 Retention Rate

914 Association’s 2015 Retention Rate

Total Retention Rate

87%

77%

Renewed after 1

st

Membership Year

94%

66%

IACA Membership Dues

Average of 914 Association’s Membership Dues

Company Dues (Retail, Wholesale)

$235

$673

Individual Dues (Artists/ Collectors)

$80/$70

$193