IACA Journal, Spring 2014 - page 16

14
IACA Journal | Spring 2014
that emerged at this time was a larger square than previously used which
looked similar to square patterns used in quilting. There were many variations
within this square design. These larger squares were formed by sewing a small
square design from a central base. From that center, additional cut strips were
added to each side. This was done multiple times, ultimately forming the large
square or diamond panel. Each of these panels was sewn together to form a
chain pattern before adding it to the garment.
Today, patchwork artists use their skills to make highly decorative regalia for
their traditional gatherings and ceremonies. Even though patchwork is typi-
cally associated with the Seminole Indians, the Muskogee Creek embrace it as
well, further helping to preserve this wonderful art form and keep a tradition
alive.
Susan Howard Sapronetti is member of the Lower Muskogee Creek Tribe and known by
tribal members as Floating Feather. She is a multi-talented artist with skills in photogra-
phy, painting, Native American bead work, sewing, and a variety of other crafts. Susan is
an IACA Artist Member. Contact Susan at
or
.
The original article has been edited.
An example of hand appliqué “Saw tooth” pattern.
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